This publication includes estimates of the contribution of the Creative Industries to UK gross value added (GVA) up to 2014. It also includes revised estimates for 2012 and 2013. Download the full report here

Released: 26 January 2016

Geographic Coverage: United Kingdom

These Creative Industries Economic Estimates are Official Statistics used to measure the direct economic contribution of the Creative Industries to the UK economy. This publication includes estimates of the contribution of the Creative Industries to UK gross value added (GVA) up to 2014. It also includes revised estimates for 2012 and 2013.

For the first time, this release also includes experimental estimates of the value of the Creative Economy (Chapter 4). Experimental Official Statistics are defined in the Code of Practice for Official Statistics as “new official statistics undergoing evaluation. They are published in order to involve users and stakeholders in their development and as a means to build in quality at an early stage.”

The most recent estimates for employment (2014) and export of services (2013) were published in June 2015, and have been summarised in the key findings for information.

DCMS aims to continuously improve the quality of estimates and better meet user needs. In this spirit, a number of further developments are outlined in Annex E. Feedback on this publication and the proposed developments are welcomed via email at [email protected].

What are the Creative Industries?

The Creative Industries were defined in the Government’s 2001 Creative Industries Mapping Document as “those industries which have their origin in individual creativity, skill and talent and which have a potential for wealth and job creation through the generation and exploitation of intellectual property”.

Based on this definition DCMS worked closely with stakeholders to determine which occupations and industries should be considered creative. These were determined on the basis of creative intensity:

1. Through consultation a list of Creative Occupations were identified.

2. The proportion of creative jobs for each industry was calculated (creative intensity).

3. Industries with creative intensity above a specified threshold are considered Creative Industries.

The Creative Economy includes the contribution of all those who are in Creative Occupations outside the creative industries as well as all those employed in the Creative Industries.

The industries and occupations defined as creative are set out in Annex B and Annex C respectively.

Methodology

Estimates in this release have been produced using the Annual Business Survey (ABS). The methodology used to produce these estimates, along with limitations and assumptions, can be found here, and summarised in Annex A. Estimates are calculated based on the relevant standard industrial classification (SIC) codes (Annex C).

Revisions to historic data reflect revisions to the ABS and the Blue Book, all figures in this publication are based on the latest published estimates from these sources.

Terminology

Throughout the report symbols have been used to indicate whether the analysis refers to:

The Creative Economy, which includes the contribution of those who are in creative occupations outside the creative industries as well as all those employed in the Creative Industries.

The Creative Industries, a subset of the Creative Economy which includes only those working in the Creative Industries themselves (and who may either be in creative occupations or in other roles e.g. finance).

In addition to the developments for the Creative Industries, DCMS published the first Digital Sector Economic Estimates as Experimental Official Statistics on 26 January 2016. These estimates use the same data sources as those used for the Creative Industries Economic Estimates and have significant overlap with the Creative Industries.

 

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